Black Educator — Music Lover — Former Athlete Turned Coach — Unapologetic — Political Scientist — African

As the world turns to sports as a distraction for the reality amerikkka faces, athletes and coaches are increasingly being asked to speak on the issues at hand, and with more freedom, than previously allotted. For Black athletes and coaches, the sports world is no different than the outside world: full of white supremacist policies, practices, and values. From the player-coach dynamics to hiring practices, racism is always present even in an industry dominated by Black labor.

The image of Allen Iverson, Michael Vick and other unapologetic Black athletes was shocking to amerikkka when these athletes, who were the faces of their franchises, decided to reject colonial standards of what Black star athletes should look, sound, and act like. African hairstyles, tattoos, and fashion were tied to being a “thug” (racist coded language) and having off-court issues. The “thug” image became a negative character trait associated specifically with Black athletes and it was “up to coach/program/organization to keep them in check.” Hollywood and the media contributed to these stereotypes and propaganda, and has helped perpetuate this myth of how Black athletes need to be “handled”. …


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“Papa Doc in Haiti hated everything white… but he moved all the white people out and HE took over to be the oppressor… And if people had been educated, they would’ve said: ‘We don’t hate the white people; we hate the OPPRESSOR, whether he be white, black, brown, or yellow.’”

-Fred Hampton

In my experience, the main criticism I receive back on my politic is “you hate white people.” I often laugh this off as an ignorant statement, but in light of several conversations I have had with Black and Brown Indigenous folx who are not as versed in Black Radical theory, I felt this piece might serve a purpose. While I can admit that in my youth, in the midst of reading The Autobiography of Malcolm X I fell in love with the militance of Black Radicalism, it was the most logical position for me to take. I grew up with a father who had been drafted into the Vietnam War in 1968 and served at Khe Sanh during the Tet Offensive and came home to become involved in The Black Panther Party (BPP). I had no choice but to grow up with a soldier’s mentality and I do believe it is necessary to preface this argument before proceeding. My father knew intimately the violence amerikkka is capable of inflicting on human beings and it influenced his approach to violence. “Never start no fight but you better finish it” was the sentiment of our household, so naturally reading “We are never aggressors. We will not attack anyone. We strive for peaceful relationships with everyone. BUT — [we teach our people that] if anyone attacks you, lay down your life! ‘ Every Muslim is taught never to (initiate a] fight. Respect another man’s life rights whether he is white, black, brown, yellow or what-. — not! Respect him as a — man. “Do unto others as you would have them do unto you!” Never be the aggressor, never look for trouble. But if any man molests you, may Allah bless you!”


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Art by Emory Douglas of BPP

As 2020 came to a close the world was subjected to yet another act of murder at the hands of the state and the complete destruction of a city block by a white amerikkkan man that seemed to be covered by the media as if it was small as a local liquor store robbery. The dichotomy of violence from the state and what is defined as terrorism is merely propaganda for the amerikkkan matrix. Terror is what the police inflict on the people every day, terror is what these politicians are doing by arguing over $600 or $2000 after nine months of a pandemic, terror is that while COVID is killing thousands of people every day the world is still prioritizing profits over people, terror is being a stolen African on stolen land. …


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photo from CNN

“I once was told every generation has its chance to make a revolution. The last had been in the 1930s. This was ours. If we doubted our success, we saw the people in Vietnam, Cuba, and China winning liberation struggles led by revolutionary forces. Many other countries of Africa and South America were also engaged in anticolonial struggles, seeking radical change and separation from the United States. Here we were in the ‘belly of the beast,’ where it was most vulnerable.”

Jeffrey Haas, The Assassination Of Fred Hampton

Reading those words recently changed my entire perspective on 2020. Like so many others I can remember the feelings that swelled in me leading us into 2020. I was hopeful to begin the new decade; a decade that would cover my 30’s, that would watch my career grow, where I could chase my dreams. It is my belief that 2020 taught us more than we could have ever hoped for and has led us to our chance to leave a lasting mark on the world, our chance to make revolution. …


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Jesus Black life aint matter, I know I talked to His Daddy

— Chance The Rapper

While many throughout history have perverted the image of Jesus Christ for their own sick gain, which is often at the expense of exploiting Black and Brown Indigenous People’s, let me stand on my belief clear: Jesus Christ was the first real communist, and His life is the foundation of my politic as a Pan-Africanist Abolitionist. Now I know what you’re thinking: Communism hates religion! Well, let’s re-examine what communism is and is not. Communism is a theoretical framework in which common people control the means of production, each person is afforded what they need and no one goes without. Communism is typically linked to Karl Marx but the theory, ideas, and practice of communism that Marx penned traced back to indigenous folx on the Continent (Africa) and on Turtle Island. These African and Indigenous societies lacked the hierarchies and were structure in a way for the common good. In communist theory, the people are tasked with building a world without private capital, and wealth is distributed as needed, where human beings are able to just be citizens of the world and walk the earth with their basic human needs met. We, the people, are not of this world and therefore do not own it and it is not ours to exploit, therefore are to steward what has been given to us: Mother Earth (the earth literally bore the weight of creating human life while in relation with God). As we analyze Jesus’ parables, commands, and His practice we can find some pretty strong connections with communism, the Black Power/Radical politic, and again, in my opinion, we can find the missing link of the revolution. Radical undying love for the people, Christ was the definition of Revolutionary Suicide. The radical love Jesus had; to live for the people, die for the people, and liberate all people eternally is truly the root of my Black Power Abolitionist politic. …


Ready or not here I come, you can’t hide

Dismissing my pain & anger as if we don’t know about those who have died

Constrained by the constitution that was written with the blood of Africans — my ancestors

The evil infection of the empire continues to exist & it festers

The very core of amerikkka is rotten, blood at the root — it’s true

Stolen people on stolen land — how would you respond if this country was at war with you?

Poverty pimps pushing the people’s pain for their personal profit — y’all fxckin sick

I’m just tryna stand on the shoulders of the radicals before me dating back to the…


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Radio Raheem in “Do The Right Thing” is symbolic of the politic of Hip-Hop

As a 90s baby I grew up on hip hop. I’m talking about some of the greatest albums to ever come out. I was in the lines at record stores, pre-ordering the new CD coming from Aftermath, Def Jam or The Roc. I listened to albums start to finish from the very jump because my pops was an old school DJ after he came home from Vietnam. My father almost only exclusively listened to vinyl, so first listens were always so special. I also was blessed to experience limewire. Music was everywhere and lyrics were my therapist for more years than I can remember. These songs held my pain, my grief, my joy, and my motivation; these bars were laying the foundation of what I believed in as I moved through life. …


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original art from my student!

Three months or so months into the school year and this week-long school break couldn’t come at a better time. Teachers are burnt, students are at their wit’s end, and as all of us try to adjust to learning in a pandemic, I will plead with every educator to take some time to decolonize your classroom, whether it is over Zoom or in person. This has been a constant theme I have been speaking with educators about for months; in the wake of COVID-19 and the uprisings of 2020 teaching should look drastically different from what it has been historically if we are to best serve students. …


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photo courtesy https://twitter.com/LilTunechi

Sorry Wale, as much as I love the song and the idea I simply cannot “root for everybody that’s Black.” Sorry y’all but I can’t. Maybe you haven’t heard the saying “all skin folx aint kin folx,” but I am a firm believer in that. I am sure that many of y’all love to quote Malcolm X and some of y’all may even walk around with an unread copy of his autobiography but for those of you have not studied the good brother let me share some of his words.

“There was two kinds of slaves. There was the house Negro and the field Negro…they [house negro] loved their master more than the master loved himself…He identified himself with his master more than his master identified with himself. And if you came to the house Negro and said, “Let’s run away, let’s escape, let’s separate,” the house Negro would look at you and say, “Man, you crazy. What you mean, separate? … He’ll pay three times as much as the house is worth just to live near his master, and then brag about ‘I’m the only Negro out here.’ ‘I’m the only one on my job.’ ‘I’m the only one in this school.’ You’re nothing but a house Negro. And if someone comes to you right now and says, ‘Let’s separate,’ you say the same thing that the house Negro said on the plantation. ‘What you mean, separate? From America? This good white man? Where you going to get a better job than you get here?’ I mean, this is what you say. ‘I ain’t left nothing in Africa,’ that’s what you say. Why, you left your mind in Africa…You’ve got field Negroes in America today. I’m a field Negro. …


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imagine from Zinn History Project

As the world is busy letting out a giant sigh of relief that Donald Trump has appeared to lose the presidential election, we, the victims of colonial terror must be careful. Be careful that the world doesn’t look away and continue to allow the human rights violations occurring everyday due to this fascist colonial government to be swept away under the guise of “returning to normal.” We must be careful to study history and understand the spike in white vigilantism that is likely to occur without any sort of protection from a colonial government. We must be careful to understand we are still a colonized people in a world colonized by evil imperial capitalists. As a history teacher I teach about colonizers and colonial governments all the time, and never have I once found that a group of colonizers were not a fascist regime. …

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